Early Wind Music Performance

. . . with a great noyse of mistralsye, trumpets, cornets and shawmes, and great plenty of waxe torches lighted" - masque for Richard II

A Great Noyse                                      

 

Welcome to the website for A Great Noyse!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are a Medieval/Renaissance wind band located in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

We've created this website to highlight who we are and give you a taste of what we do.

What we would also like to accomplish is a place where enthusiasts of early wind music and instruments can connect, share information and ideas.

If you would like to join this group, visit our "Members" page. Feel free to post comments on our "Forum" page, and contact us to have your event posted on our Calendar. At the very least, please let us know you have visited by signing our guest book.

 

Ancient music tells a story

A Great Noyse was formed in the Fall of 2007 in Victoria, BC, Canada. We have performed numerous times in the Greater Victoria area.

Between us we have over 25 instruments - all faithful reproductions of wind instruments from before 1650.

But we are not just about music (as if that isn't enough!). We are all interested and informed about the historical settings of the music we play, and we endeavor to bring that history alive in our performances. To do this, we often use the device of linking the music with a narrative story of real people from the time, that informs and entertains the audience. We hope that this way, we can transport our audiences to distant times and places that, for most of us, are a part of our collective heritage.

 

"Your concert was a wonderful experience for the audience."

"Besides giving our ears a musical treat, you had toes tapping and intellects challenged. Your readings and costumes really added a special atmosphere. I could almost smell the smoke from the fire and candles as I listened."

"I think you have made some Early Music converts! "

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events

Performing in the beautiful St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church